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Pennies spilling out of a jar

Increases in minimum wage may not have anticipated positive health effects, study shows

February 10, 2020 | UW News

Results of a new study from University of Washington Center of Public Health Nutrition finds that an increase in minimum wage really didn’t have a huge impact on health overall.

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Cutting sweet potato

Are we doing diet and nutrition research wrong?

January 28, 2020 | Fred Hutch

Public health researcher Dr. Ross Prentice from University of Washington Department of Biostatistics is interviewed by Fred Hutch about ways he is applying intake biomarkers to assess and improve studies of diet and chronic disease. In this interview, Prentice highlights a recent feeding study he conducted with Drs. Johanna Lampe and Marion Neuhouser, core faculty members in the UW Nutritional Sciences Program, in which they used intake biomarkers derived from blood micronutrients and participant characteristics obtained from the Women’s Health Study.

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Photo of vegetables and grains in a plastic container

20 changes you need to make in your life in 2020

January 7, 2020 | Insider

This article features a quote from Adam Drewnowski, director of the UW Nutritional Sciences Program and the Center for Public Health Nutrition offering advice to cook at home, rather than eating out, for a better diet at no significant cost increase.

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Sea bean

As the planet warms, unusual crops could become climate saviors — if we’re willing to eat them

December 20, 2019 | Ensia

Eli Wheat, a core faculty member in the Nutritional Science Program and Program on the Environment at the University of Washington is quoted about how government food production subsidies in our nation do not allow free market forces to act.

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How Washington keeps America sick and fat

November 4, 2019 | Politico

Mario Kratz, an associate professor in epidemiology, medicine, and nutritional sciences at the UW is quoted about the cost-prohibitive factors with NIH grants which present barriers for securing adequate funding for well-controlled dietary studies. Kratz works at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center where he studies dietary interventions and cancer prevention.

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Jennifer Otten and Branden Born Livable City team

Faculty Friday features Jennifer Otten, Branden Born and Livable City Year

November 8, 2019 | The Whole U

The academic collaboration between Jennifer Otten and Branden Born is highlighted in The Whole U in a Faculty Friday feature.

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Keto, fat and cancer: It’s complicated

October 24, 2019 | Fred Hutch News

Marian Neuhouser and Mario Kratz, core faculty members with the UW Nutritional Sciences Program and researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center are quoted in this article discussing evidence known so far about best diets for cancer treatment and health.

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Photo of nutrition books in bookstore

Health claims in nutrition books can be a ‘volcano of nonsense.’ A new website is fighting back.

May 23, 2019 | The Seattle Times

Dr. Mario Kratz, a faculty member in the UW Nutritional Sciences Program and a researcher at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center is quoted in this article highlighting redpenreviews.org , a resource to help consumers verify if health nutrition books are scientifically accurate.

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Marian Neuhouser

Hands on with the latest prostate cancer research

May 14, 2019 | Fred Hutch News

Dr. Marian Neuhouser, a Fred Hutch nutritional epidemiologist and core faculty member in UW Nutritional Sciences highlights the importance of a healthy diet in lowering the risk of cancer, including prostate cancer.

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Photo of soda aisle in a grocery store

Impetus builds to change status quo for sugary-drink sales

April 3, 2019 | UW Medicine

Jim Krieger, a Health Services faculty member and CPHN collaborator is featured in this story about two new recently-funded studies he will help conduct that examine the effect of taxing sugary drinks, and testing counter-marketing and healthy-beverage social media messages among parents of Latinx children age 0-5.

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